Saturday, March 27, 2010

Regarding the Failed Policies of The Past

Those of us of a certain age will notice a certain resemblance between the O administration and that of the Soviet Union, althought the Soviets were perhaps a bit more discreet about their hypocrisy. 

The Soviet ruling class was known as the "nomenklatura," which Wikipedia describes as follows:

The Russian term nomenklatura (Russian: номенклату́ра, Russian pronunciation: [nəmʲɪnklɐˈturə]) derived from the Latin nomenclatura meaning a list of names.

The term was popularized by the Soviet dissident Michael Voslenski, who in 1970 authored a book titled Nomenklatura: The Soviet Ruling Class (Russian: Номенклатура. Господствующий класс Советского Союза).


The nomenklatura referred to the Communist party's authority to make appointments to key positions throughout the governmental system, as well as throughout the party's own hierarchy. Specifically, the nomenklatura consisted of two separate lists: one was for key positions, appointments to which were made by authorities within the party; the other was for persons who were potential candidates for appointment to those positions. The Politburo, as part of its nomenklatura authority, maintained a list of ministerial and ambassadorial positions that it had the power to fill, as well as a separate list of potential candidates to occupy those positions.

Coextensive with the nomenklatura were patron-client relations. Officials who had the authority to appoint individuals to certain positions cultivated loyalties among those whom they appointed. The patron (the official making the appointment) promoted the interests of clients in return for their support. Powerful patrons, such as the members of the Politburo, had many clients. Moreover, an official could be both a client (in relation to a higher-level patron) and a patron (to other, lower-level officials).

Because a client was beholden to his patron for his position, the client was eager to please his patron by carrying out his policies. The Soviet power structure essentially consisted of groups of vassals (clients) who had an overlord (the patron). The higher the patron, the more clients the patron had. Patrons protected their clients and tried to promote their careers. In return for the patron's efforts to promote their careers, the clients remained loyal to their patron. Thus, by promoting his clients' careers, the patron could advance his own power.

Does rather sound like Her Highness Nancy P and her private jet and His Imperial O-ness using Air Force One for date night in the Big Apple. 

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